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Grumpier Old Men

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 6:51 am 
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Not sure why you have focused on retail. I have never worked in retail but have supplied it and found it to be cutthroat and penny pinching. Pension costs a real to those who pay for them. Those of us fortunate enough to be guided into pension funds at an early age have benefited but it was difficult when the choice was mortgage, school fees or pension contributions.

Having an employer put the lion's share of the pension payment in is a factor unless you are not expecting to get your three score and ten.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 8:14 am 
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I focused on retail because it is poorly paid, not a reference to what you did in management, whatever that was. My point was, the term manager covers a multitude of job and skill levels. In the same way as the term Engineer, is used today. It could mean anything from a highly skilled engine designer working in formula one to the man who fixes a leaky washing machine. It is also true that several public sector jobs are not comparable to the private sector because they do not exist in the private sector so the skills are not comparable to anything in the private sector, neither is the remuneration.

Having an employer put the lion's share of the pension payment is not a factor when looking for employment, it does not pay the bills, it is worthless until the day someone retires. Yes, it is nice to have, I would have preferred more money while working, that way I could decide how it was spent. If I had wanted a big pension pot I could have invested the higher pay into a pension fund. I did not go into the public sector after my military service for the money or the pension. I joined the police because my wife was expecting and I had no job, after nearly 2 years recovering from a motorbike crash that nearly killed me, that crash ended my military career. I was left without a job. Joining the police was the last thing I ever intended to do, the pension was not an attraction.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 3:39 pm 
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I'm still confused as to why you picked retail an appalling line of work for comparison.

As an accountant, the skills across public and private are transferable and across sectors of private moving is relatively easy. The quality of staff in the public sector I suffered were diabolical. Yes, there were some awful accountants in the private sector, but they got found out, unlike those who worked for the local Council or BBC.

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The problem with retirement is that you never get a day off.

The problem with playing golf with the seniors is that half the players could not see where your ball went and the other half can not remember.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 6:01 pm 
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whostolemyhair? wrote:
I'm still confused as to why you picked retail an appalling line of work for comparison. it was used as an example because it illustrated the diversity of managerial jobs. My youngest sisters husband is a superstore manager for a big supermarket, the work is very poorly paid the hours are long and if targets are not met, you are out on your ear. When I had my business we paid warehouse managers more than he got for shorter hours and no targets to meet.

As an accountant, the skills across public and private are transferable and across sectors of private moving is relatively easy. The quality of staff in the public sector I suffered were diabolical. Yes, there were some awful accountants in the private sector, but they got found out, unlike those who worked for the local Council or BBC. My eldest daughter started off as an accountant, she got a degree in maths, then trained as an accountant before she moved into banking, made a fortune then retired at 40 after buying up property and investing in God knows what, she now lives abroad. The public sector has more job security because the unions are so strong, it is near impossible to get rid of poor performers, I would agree with that, it happens anywhere if people can get away with it. We had a few in my business, it took forever to get shot of them. Employment law has never been in favour of employers.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:00 am 
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The focus is now on the Pension Triple Lock - the youngsters are jealous of the 2.5% guarantee and want it removed.
This would not only affect current pensioners, but also reduce the state pension relative to the working wage in the future, so that (shock, horror) when these youngsters get older themselves and reach pension age, they will see an even larger drop in income - or maybe no pension at all.
Which may be the plan all along.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 12:00 pm 
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It appears that my £244.30 per week next year is safe , for the moment. As the first age group to not get the state pension at 65 , born 1955, I have always anticipated being screwed on this. I would not be surprised if the state pension becomes means tested.

Since Gordon Brown raped private sector pensions for billions in 1997, it has been clear that pensions are a minefield. Only public sector can afford them, and take the money from the private sector to fund them.

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The problem with retirement is that you never get a day off.

The problem with playing golf with the seniors is that half the players could not see where your ball went and the other half can not remember.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:31 pm 
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-54650538

No surprises that the public sector does not how to give money away properly.

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The problem with retirement is that you never get a day off.

The problem with playing golf with the seniors is that half the players could not see where your ball went and the other half can not remember.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:20 pm 
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55013192

Corbyn would say this level of debt proves him right about the money tree. And the public sector still think they should get pay rises funded by the shrinking private sector...

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The problem with retirement is that you never get a day off.

The problem with playing golf with the seniors is that half the players could not see where your ball went and the other half can not remember.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:55 pm 
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whostolemyhair? wrote:
And the public sector still think they should get pay rises funded by the shrinking private sector...


I couldn't agree more. The private sector has taken a real pounding for much of this year. Once again, the public sector will no doubt be crying poverty and being hard done to.

I've worked throughout this pandemic and had to mix with people. Do I get a special acknowledgement or pay rise for it? No. It's "as you were" and the likely comment from 'the powers that be' when it comes to some wondering what this year's Christmas Bonus will be - "you've still got a job for now". Try that in the public sector and there would be strikes galore.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:22 pm 
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No pay rise for the public sector - although harsh, it does guarantee no pay rise for the unmitigated bstds who knowingly sent Covid positive patients to care homes.

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Tolerance is a set allowance that ensures a good fit and smooth running. Any more tolerance and things get sloppy or don't work at all.
We live in a very, very tolerant society already.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:33 pm 
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What odds does anyone believe I could get on the expected MP's pay and expenses rises to go ahead despite public sector wages being frozen? :evil:

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2020 9:20 am 
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MP's should be leading by example - and freezing their own pay for the same duration. This is certainly one point where the public sector has a point. We all know that's unlikely to happen though.

I read in the news last weekend that the TUC weren't ruling out strike action. Is this the same TUC that has taken the official leftist line of rabidly supporting every Tory lockdown measure currently destroying our society and economy?

At this rate it'll be back to the three day week of the seventies again, same old socialists determined to work as little as possible.

These are the same workers on full pay and gold plated benefits during Johnson's irrational draconian measures. They've enjoyed what I consider to be legal immunity. The negative impacts haven't been shared equally. Whilst they remain in work on the same salary, the same can't be said for hundreds of thousands of private sector workers, who've seen their jobs evaporate.

What part of "we are billions in debt" do they not understand?

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2020 3:35 pm 
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So what will happen next after the public sector pay freeze?

Private sector funding has dried up, so where will they get their money from? I'm sure the unions will be up in arms....

So glad I am retired.

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The problem with retirement is that you never get a day off.

The problem with playing golf with the seniors is that half the players could not see where your ball went and the other half can not remember.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:22 pm 
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...and still they spend billions on HS2... :roll:

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:44 pm 
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Oi Trumpy, don't knock HS2 or I'll burn your stupid wig.

HS2 will pump quite a lot of money into the economy, or more specifically, my economy.

I happen to think it is one of the finest engineering projects ever, and I am not swayed in any way, not at all, by the sheer coincidence that it will require a shed load of a product that we make, and nobody else in the UK makes, nor can they get from abroad.

You need to embrace this technology, learn to love it, and realise that it is a fine thing that our government is doing for the nation. Well bits of it anyway. Actually just my bit, oh and a load of Boris's mates of course.

Before anybody asks, no I am not one of Boris's mates.

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